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Friday, September 14, 2007

The destiny of Asia

Asia’s strategic triangle: China-India-Japan Ramesh Thakur The Hindu Opinion - Leader Page Articles Friday, Sep 14, 2007 The three Asian giants can transform Asia into an area of peace by thinking creatively and cultivating relations based on complementary interests and realistic expectations rather than the deadweight of history or the baggage of naive idealism.
The destiny of Asia in this century will be shaped by the triangular relationship between China, India, and Japan. The ‘strategic footprint’ of that triangle will cover the world. Cooperation between them will help to anchor peace and prosperity in Asia. Rivalry and conflict will roil the world. Japan is the economic powerhouse that is slowly but surely shaking off the shackles on the deployment of its military forces overseas in the cause of international peace. China and India, each nuclear armed and with a billion people, are the heartland of the world. Their phenomenal growth over the last decade in particular has acted as southern engines of growth for the whole world.
The historic trends sweeping across Asia along with most of the rest of the world include democratisation (yes, even in China, especially at the grassroots level), globalisation, intensified economic interactions, and great power harmony. The three Asian giants can transform Asia into an area of peace by thinking creatively and cultivating relations based on complementary interests and realistic expectations rather than the deadweight of history or the baggage of naive idealism...
China has usurped the traditional U.S. role of exporting hope, optimism, and reassurance...China, India, and Japan should join forces to construct an architecture of regional order that fosters peace and promotes prosperity across Asia and the world without cutting across existing bilateral relations of any of the three. (Ramesh Thakur is distinguished fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and professor of political science at the University of Waterloo. For the last three decades he has lived in the Pacific in Fiji, New Zealand, Australia and Japan successively.)

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